M. McLeod Young

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gremlinowl:

Vina Rust

Revelation of the interior is something I have been increasingly concerned with since I began working with metal, partly because intriguing inner spaces are often a happy byproduct of metal fabrication, but also because curiosity has always led me to look beneath the surface of things. In my most recent work, consisting largely of sliced forms, the main focus is on the interior rather than exterior structure.

In addition to botanical illustration, the influences on the overall design of the work and on my own sense of aesthetics in general are quite varied. With a cultural background that spans three continents (I grew up mainly in the UK, and my parents are Thai, with some Russian, and American), I often draw inspiration from disparate sources, the more significant ones being the illustrations of Arthur Rackham and Aubrey Beardsley, the jewelry of Lalique, and the so-called “ethnic” jewelry of South Asia, Southeast Asia and Oceania. It seems, however, that the works I find most appealing do tend to share a common thread: not only do they express the artist’s acute observation of and appreciation for the natural forms that surround him/her, but also the tension between beauty and menace, the “look but don’t touch” phenomenon that is so often found as a means of defense in nature. The fact that I am drawn to this is hopefully something that is carried over in my work.

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

Seems I’ve been tagged in a thing by the lovely stormphyre.  Which is kinda awesome, as I don’t often get tagged in things. ;-> So here goes…

1. What book are you currently reading or recently finished?  I just finished reading Skin Game by Jim Butcher. 

2. If you could have a super power, what would it be?  Oh man, that one’s hard. Wait, no it’s not.  I want to be a shape shifter.  Any shape.  That way I can be a bird, a dragon, a shark, a chair, male, female, both, neither… 

3. If you could go to school for anything, what would you go to school for?  Well, I just had the opportunity to go back to school and I got my BFA in ceramics, so… I’m not so sure I want to go back for anything else? Maybe metalsmithing.  Or an artist residency at Penland or Haystack.  Oh, or the upcoming workshop with Beth Cavener Stichter.  I think I would give up a certain number of teeth to go to that.

4. What would your daemon be, and why? Gotta go with a Raven. Decked out in black, curious, collector of shiny objects and mischievous as hell.  (There’s a reason my business is Wicked Raven Studio. ;->)

5.Given unlimited funds and time, where would you travel, and what would you do there?  Everywhere. Almost literally.  I love traveling so much.  Train, plane, boat, car, doesn’t matter.  Specifically, I would go to Scotland, to the Isle of Skye. I’m a MacLeod and the clan seat is there at Castle Dunvegan.  I always wanted to visit. Then I think I’d do a tour of southern Spain, Rome, Greece, and Turkey, and a big stop in Egypt. Back to Dubai, and Abu Dhabi.  And I’d like to see India. And Russia. And Australia. Oh, and Japan again! (I’ll stop now, or I never will.)

6. Coffee or tea? Both. Though I do drink waaaay more coffee than I do tea of late.

7. What games do you like?  I’m actually not much of a game player, of any kind really. When I do play it tends to be words games or trivia types.

8. If you could meet any fictitious character, who would it be, where are they from, and why?  I think I would like to meet Erik, from Susan Kay’s novel Phantom.  To hear him sing, and to listen to what I imagine would be some truly amazing and intriguing stories.  That, and I always did have a soft spot for him.  He could use a little more love in his life.

9. What hobby thing would you pick up if you had the time/energy/money?  I’ve never learned to play an instrument, and I would love to learn to play the violin.

10. Who is a snail?  Redriyo is a snail. ;->

11. If you could move anywhere, where would you move? Honestly, I wouldn’t move at all.  I live on a mountain in New Hampshire, where the snow is deep, the night is dark, and the stars are beautiful.  If anything I would maybe move deeper into the woods, further from this crazy thing called civilization.

Alright, so part of this game is that I’m supposed to tag people and ask them questions of my own.

1. If you had a free afternoon to go anywhere, do anything, where and what would that be?

2. If you could have a super power, what would it be?

3. If you could be reincarnated as an animal/drink/ice cream flavor, what would it be?

4. Do you have any tattoos? Do you want any?

5.Given unlimited funds and time, where would you travel, and what would you do there? 

6. City or country? Why?

7. It’s the beginning of the zombie apocalypse and you’re the protagonist in the last movie you watched.  How screwed are you?

8. If you had to choose one food to eat for a week straight, what would it be?

9. When you go to a movie, do you just sit wherever or do you have a go to spot?

10. What’s your favorite junk food?

11. If you won the lottery, what would you do first?

And I shall tag: maderr delightful-horror amasugiru veebat aburstingflameoffun ltpotter5878 seananmcguire and anyone else who thinks it would be fun to answer.

itscolossal:

Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original.

(Source: kottke.org)

cho1oepus:

I got the chance to meet an amazing SoCal glass/metal artist today in Baltimore of all places. Check out Evan Chambers. #glass #metal #lights #art #ca #evanchambersobjects #objects #metalsmith #creatures

cho1oepus:

I got the chance to meet an amazing SoCal glass/metal artist today in Baltimore of all places. Check out Evan Chambers. #glass #metal #lights #art #ca #evanchambersobjects #objects #metalsmith #creatures

thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

moderneden:

Squeeee!!! We just got our copies of @HiFructoseMag and are so proud of Erika Sanada and her awesome spread in the magazine.

Stay tuned for her solo show next year at the gallery and for more exciting news from one of our favorite artists: http://www.moderneden.com/collections/erika-sanada

sixpenceee:

The following you see, is a sculpture and not a cartoon! The artist in Neil Dawson and you can view this video here

It is located in New Zealand.

imaradiohead:

"Remnant"; something left behind; When making this, I wanted to portray the feeling that this piece was not of this world. Something that an organism has left behind.

Photos of the inside are soon to be taken

Thom Cressman - Remnant